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Samuel Thompson

Samuel T. Thompson (November 12, 1836 - October 20, 1920) served as a corporal in Company H, 13th Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry.

Personal life

Samuel Thompson was born November 12, 1836 in Carter County, Tennessee to Larkin and Mary (Garland) Thompson. He married Sarah Jane Emmert (1844-1913) with whom he had six children.[1]

Civil War service

Thompson enlisted as a private in Company H on September 24, 1863 in Carter County, Tennessee for a period of three years and mustered in October 28, 1863 at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee. He was promoted to corporal on April 1, 1865.

He is described as 25 years old, 5' 8" tall, fair complexion, black eyes, dark hair, and by occupation a farmer.

Thompson was detailed in May 1864 as a company cook. He is listed as present for duty until November 1864 when he was left at Asylum General Hospital in Knoxville, Tennessee until January 1865 to recover from wounds received in action at the Battle of Bull's Gap.[2] On the afternoon of November 11, Companies H and I were sent out in the direction of Lick Creek. According to the regimental history, "They had not gone far until they received a galling fire from behind an old fence grown up with briars and bushes, behind which the enemy was concealed."[3] It was added that, "Samuel Thompson made almost a miraculous escape. A shot took off one of his fingers and struck his belt buckle with such force as to knock him off his horse just as the company was turning to retreat. Lieut. Freels and other members of the company stopped under the heavy fire to assist Thompson on his horse, and all retreated under the guns of the fort."[4]

Thompson mustered out with the regiment on September 5, 1865 at Knoxville. He had last been paid to August 31, 1864, was owed $18.21 from the government for clothing, had been paid a $25 bounty, and was owed a $75 bounty.

Post-war life

Thompson died October 20, 1920 in Watauga, Tennessee and is buried there at Thompson Cemetery.

Notes

  1. 1910 U.S. Census, 13th Civil District, Carter County, Tennessee.
  2. The date of his discharge from the hospital and his return to the regiment was not recorded.
  3. Scott & Angel, p. 205.
  4. Ibid.
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